Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resource Center

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Podcasts from Harvard

Podcast: How to conquer your anxieties during the COVID-19 outbreak (recorded 3/23/20)

Your feelings arise from a misaligned ratio of stress to resiliency. The more resilient you become the less stress you’ll feel. Dr. Greg Fricchione, director of the Benson-Henry Mind Body Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital, describes the tools and techniques for building resilience into your life during stressful times so we can better manage our anxieties.

Podcast: The front lines of COVID-19: A doctor’s eye view (recorded 3/20/20)

Dr. Todd Ellerin is an infectious diseases physician at South Shore Health in Weymouth Massachusetts, and an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. He also serves as an associate physician at Boston’s prestigious Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He offers insight—and practical information– from the front lines in the battle to stem COVID-19.

Podcast: Coronavirus status report: Harvard public health expert Dr. Ashish K. Jha fills us in on where we are headed (recorded 3/19/20)

The COVID-19 outbreak has caused markets to collapse and worldwide health systems to become overwhelmed. When there’s a global pandemic, it’s nice to hear from the steady, transparent and yes even reassuring voice of experts on the front lines. We spoke to Dr. Ashish K. Jha, faculty director of the Harvard Global Health Institute. Dr. Jha’s recent appearance on the PBS Newshour caused reverberations throughout the federal and state response system. Here’s his update.

Podcast: A Harvard infectious diseases doctor looks at COVID-19 (recorded 3/3/20)

Dr. Todd Ellerin, director of infectious diseases at South Shore Health in Weymouth, MA and instructor at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, gave us an update on the rapidly developing story surrounding the coronavirus Covid-19.

Experts from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health offer science and evidence-based insights on the public health news of the day. The current focus is the novel coronavirus spreading around the world.

Featured Resources

Backer JA, Klinkenberg D, Wallinga J. The incubation period of 2019-nCoV infections among travelers from Wuhan, China. medRxiv 2020 Jan 30 VIEW AT medRxiv

Bajema KL, Oster AM, McGovern OL, et al. Persons evaluated for 2019 novel coronavirus ─ United States, January 2020. MMWR 2020 Jan 14;69(6):166-79 VIEW AT MMWR

Bialek S, Boundy E, Bowen V, et al, for the CDC COVID-19 Response Team. Severe outcomes among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)—United States, February 12–March 16, 2020. MMWR 2020 (published online Mar 18) VIEW AT MMWR

Burke RM, Midgley CM, Dratch A, et al. Active monitoring of persons exposed to patients with confirmed COVID-19 ─ United States, January-February 2020. MMWR 2020 Mar 3;69(Early release) VIEW AT MMWR

Chan JFW, Yuan S, Kok KH, et al. A familial cluster of pneumonia associated with the 2019 novel coronavirus indicating person-to-person transmission: a study of a family cluster. Lancet 2020 (published online Jan 24) VIEW AT Lancet

Dong Y, Mo X, Hu Y, et al. Epidemiological characteristics of 2143 pediatric patients with 2019 coronavirus disease in China. Pediatrics 2020 Mar VIEW AT Pediatrics

Guan WJ, Ni ZY, Hu Y, et al. Clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 in China. N Engl J Med 2020 (published online Feb 28) VIEW AT N Engl J Med

Huang C, Wang Y, Li X, et al. Clinical features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China. Lancet 2020 (published online Jan 24) VIEW AT Lancet

Li Q, Guan X, Wu P, et al. Early transmission dynamics in Wuhan, China, of novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia. N Engl J Med 2020 (published online Jan 29) VIEW AT N Engl J Med

Lu R, Zhao X, Li J, et al. Genomic characterisation and epidemiology of 2019 novel coronavirus: implications for virus origins and receptor binding. Lancet 2020 (published online Jan 30) VIEW AT Lancet

Moriarty LF, Plucinski MM, Marston BJ, et al. Public health responses to COVID-19 outbreaks on cruise ships—worldwide, February-March 2020. MMWR 2020 Mar 23;69 VIEW AT MMWR

Onder G, Rezza G, Brusaferro S. Case-fatality rate and characteristics of patients dying in relation to COVID-19 in Italy. JAMA Netw Open 2020 (published online Mar 23) VIEW AT JAMA Network

Qiu H, Wu J, Hong L, et al. Clinical and epidemiological features of 36 children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Zhejiang, China: an observational cohort study. Lancet Infect Dis 2020 (published online Mar 25) VIEW AT Lancet Infect Dis

Shi S, Qin M, Shen B, et al. Association of cardiac injury with mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. JAMA Cardiol 2020 (published online Mar 25) VIEW AT JAMA Cardiol

Wang D, Hu B, Hu C, et al.  Clinical characteristics of 138 hospitalized patients with 2019 novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia in Wuhan, China. JAMA 2020 (published online Feb 7) VIEW AT JAMA

Wang W, Zu Y, Gao R. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in different types of clinical specimens. (Research Letter) JAMA 2020 (published online Mar 11) VIEW AT JAMA

Wei M, Yuan J, Liu Y, et al. Novel coronavirus infection in hospitalized infants under 1 year of age in China. JAMA 2020 (published online Feb 14) VIEW AT JAMA

Weng TY, Yen H, Mahmood K, et al. Workshop report on global harmonization of enterovirus vaccines. Emerg Infect Dis 2020 Apr;26(4) VIEW AT Emerg Infect Dis

Wu JT, Leung K, Bushman M, et al. Estimating clinical severity of COVID-19 from the transmission dynamics in Wuhan, China. Nature Med 2020 (published online Mar 19) VIEW AT Nature Med

Zeng L, Xia S, Yuan W. Neonatal early-onset infection with SARS-CoV-2 in 33 neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. JAMA Pediatr (Research Letter) 2020 (published online Mar 26) VIEW AT JAMA Pediatr

Zhu N, Zhang D, Wang W, et al. A novel coronavirus from patients with pneumonia in China, 2019. N Engl J Med 2020 (published online Jan 24) VIEW AT N Engl J Med

FAQs about novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

What are the symptoms of Covid-19?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don’t feel unwell. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. About one in every five people who contract it need hospital care. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

How does Covid-19 spread?

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 3-6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Can someone spread the virus without being sick?

People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest). Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with COVID-19, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community.

Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. It is important to wash your hands frequently, avoid touching your face in public and clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

How severe is Covid-19 ? Should I worry ?

Illness due to COVID-19 infection is generally mild, especially for children and young adults. About one in every five people who contract it need hospital care. It is therefore quite normal for people to worry about how the COVID-19 outbreak will affect them and their loved ones.

Most coronavirus illnesses are mild with fever and cough. The vast majority of people with COVID-19 do not require hospital care. A much smaller percentage of people get severely ill with lung and breathing problems like pneumonia. People over the age of 60 and people with underlying medical conditions are at highest risk.

CDC recommends that older adults or those who have certain medical conditions consider postponing travel. More travel information.

Who is at risk for developing severe illness ?

Illness due to COVID-19 is generally mild, especially for children and young adults. The vast majority of people with COVID-19 infection do not require hospital care. A much smaller percentage of people get severely ill with lung and breathing problems like pneumonia.

People at high risk for complications from COVID-19 are:

  • People older than 60 years of age
  • People with chronic medical conditions
  • People with compromised immune systems
  • Those who are pregnant

The CDC recommends that older adults or those who have certain medical conditions consider postponing travel. More travel information.

Credit : Johns Hopkins University

Credit : Johns Hopkins University

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